Introduce yourself!


#1

This thread is your chance to show off your baby to the world without it being a full-blown announcement or request for comments. :blush:

  • Where do you work out of?
  • What do you you work on? (you can list projects that don’t use anything like bors)
  • How did you end up interested in bors-ng?
  • Do you have a blog or GitHub or something to follow?
  • What do you enjoy other than programming?
  • Anything else we should know? (this bullet point is not intended to sound ominous)

This topic is only for introductions. For anything else, please take a look at the categories! For example, continue conversations about hobbies in The Lounge.


I’m Michael Howell, basically running this forum and bors-ng in general. I live in Arizona, and get very smug about not having DST. Not a big fan of Joe Arpaio, though.

I originally started this to use at work, because it seemed like a good idea but homu’s codebase wasn’t very good (and the original creator had abandoned it). I’m not sure if bors-ng’s codebase is better, but it works in multitenant setups like the big public instance, which is really cool. It’s also all-open-source.

Cerebrum LABdivus, the software I work on at work, is basically a specialized factory tracking system for anatomic pathology labs, because a pathology lab is essentially a “disassembly line”: start with a tissue sample, slice it into smaller and smaller pieces and put them on slides, look at them under a microscope, and produce a diagnosis report as a deliverable. Some of our competitors are hospital systems first and lab management second: this is terrible, since while a pathology lab is a specialized factory, a hospital is closer to a specialized hotel. Due to the un-sexiness of our business, our biggest competitor is Microsoft Excel.

I don’t have an actively maintained blog, but I do have a GitHub and Twitter.

Some of my favorite games have been slither.io and Cuphead. I also skateboard, though that’s more a mode of transport than a hobby (my eyesight is too poor to drive, and I live in a suburban sprawl).


#2

Hi, I’m the software behind Discourse’s tutorial. Right now, the rest of the app and I run on an AWS server in Oregon. I’d rather be hosted on DigitalOcean, since that’s what the Discourse team themselves recommend, but :woman_shrugging: I’m not the one paying the bill…

I spend most of my time sending private Messages to new users. You’ve probably already gotten a PM from me, with instructions on how to add a bookmark and a couple links. If I forgot to send one to you, you can click my user picture, click Message, and send me @discobot start new user :point_left:

Since I don’t write software myself, I’m not actually that interested in bors-ng, though I figure whatever helps you all ship less bugs is a plus for apps like me! :grin: I also don’t have a blog or anything, though the Discourse company themselves have a pretty cool one.

As for the last thing you should know: admins on this site can and do read your “private messages.” If you want to have a conversation with someone else on the forum, and you’re not okay with the staff being able to see it, you need to exchange email addresses.


#3

#4

Hello Everyone!

I’m Jonathan Niles, a fan of open source software and the bors-ng project. I work all of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, but am based in the capital city of Kinshasa. I too do not have DST. :smiley:

Our team discovered bors-ng while trying to take an old, untested codebase and write tests for it. We originally tried homu as well, but the future of the project was unclear and we didn’t want to invest too much time in managing our own tooling - both things that the bors-ng project solved.

I work with a team of Congolese colleagues on various software focused on management and health system strengthening. In addition to coding, I train users in basic computing, management principles, and accounting. We also do some work on internal applications for gathering and aggregating health statistics using Open Data Kit.

In my spare time, I play guitar and mess around with Raspberry Pis and Mikrotik routers like monitoring the skies over Kinshasa. I also enjoy visiting hospitals in the interior of the country whenever I get a chance!

I’ve never gotten into social media/blogging, so the closest thing is my Github.

Looking forward to hearing from more bors-ng users!


#6

I’m Tristan Seligmann, hacker-of-all-trades and Haskell enthusiast. While I’m based in South Africa (UTC+2, no DST) my circadian rhythm stubbornly resists all efforts to entrain it to a 24 hour day, so I visit all the timezones on a regular basis.

My day job (which is sometimes a night job due to aforementioned sleeping disorder) is working on software that handles Finance & Insurance tasks in the motor dealership industry. This mostly consists of pulling data out of one system and shoving it into another; the trick is to paper over all the sharp edges and mismatches between systems so as not to drive the user insane. We started using bors-ng simply because landing multiple branches at once with a 20+ minute test cycle was taking far too much time and effort when we had to do each branch one by one, by hand.

In my spare time I tend to play games, dabble with Haskell, and … well, anything to do with computers and programming really.


#7

Hi everyone!

I’m James Sanderson, but I usually just go by zofrex. I live in the UK, and I’m very sad about DST :frowning_face:

I’m used to bors from working on Rust things, and I was very excited to discover that someone has made it available as a service! I’m going to be using it with a small web project I’m building in Rust. In many ways it’s a testbed to get the hang of things before I embark on a large web project in Rust, and having sound testing & building infrastructure in place is definitely one of the things I’ll need!

I don’t have a blog either, but you can find me on Twitter. In my spare time I work on my projects and play games - just started Horizon Zero Dawn :slight_smile:


#8